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Test Bank Design Basics 9th Edition by Stephen Pentak

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Test Bank Design Basics 9th Edition by Stephen Pentak

Test Bank Design Basics 9th Edition by Stephen Pentak

 

Chapter 1

 

 

 

Select the response that best answers the question or completes the statement.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

 

  1. To ‘design’ means:

 

  1. To put paint to canvas
  2. To plan or organize
  3. To send graphs to the printer
  4. To try to balance life and work

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Correct. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Art seeks visual solutions in what is often called the ‘rules’ process.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See “Introduction - Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See “Introduction - Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. The arts are called creative fields because:

 

  1. For every problem there is only one right solution
  2. For every action there is a mathematical formula
  3. There are no predetermined correct answers to the problems
  4. Everything is vague and acceptable

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Correct. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Any and all designs are equally valid and visually successful.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See “Introduction – Design Defined” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is correct?

 

  1. Content implies subject matter; form is the elements and principles of design
  2. Content is really form; form is really content
  3. Content is about the elements and principles of design; form implies subject matter
  4. Neither form nor content exist

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Correct. See “Thinking – Form and Content” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Form and Content” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Form and Content” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Form and Content” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. One of the essential primary roles of art is to:

 

  1. Use words
  2. Investigate
  3. Communicate
  4. Instigate

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Correct. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. The majority of creative people use these activities to jump-start their process:

 

  1. Reading, writing and mathematics
  2. Exercising, resting and more exercising
  3. Thinking, looking and doing
  4. Working, wishing and making a visualization board

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Correct. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Procedures – Steps in the Process” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. A good way to get started in solving a design problem is to:

 

  1. Think about the problem
  2. Think about the solution
  3. Think about the audience
  4. Think about all of the choices

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Getting Started” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Getting Started” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Getting Started” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Correct. See “Thinking – Getting Started” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. “Form follows function” refers to:

 

  1. The alignment of molded wood forms and bent steel
  2. When purpose defines an object and efficiency is obvious
  3. When function dictates and content is discarded
  4. The way power tools shape furniture design

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Form and Function” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Correct. See “Thinking – Form and Function” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Form and Function” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Thinking – Form and Function” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. The process of looking includes observing both nature and human artifacts.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See "Looking – Sources: Nature” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See "Looking – Sources: Nature” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Studying art from all periods, regions, and cultures introduces you to a wealth of visual creations that equip you to discover your own solutions to design problems.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See “Looking – Sources: Artifacts and Object” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See “Looking – Sources: Artifacts and Object” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Exposure to mass media such as television, film, websites and print images have little or no effect on our visual sensibility.

 

 

 

True

 

Incorrect. See “Looking - Sources: History and Culture” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Correct. See “Looking - Sources: History and Culture” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Doing formal research into new or unfamiliar subjects allows us to:

 

  1. Be assured that we will pass a college course
  2. Understand the meaning of all historical art
  3. Find the elements that shape our own visual language
  4. Pick Vincent Van Gogh, our favorite artist

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Looking - Sources: History and Culture” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Looking - Sources: History and Culture” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Correct. See “Looking - Sources: History and Culture” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Looking - Sources: History and Culture” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Doing starts with:

 

  1. Dreaming about doing
  2. Visual experimentation and thinking with materials
  3. Thinking about thinking
  4. Thinking about Art History

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Doing – Thinking with Materials” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Correct. See “Doing – Thinking with Materials” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Doing – Thinking with Materials” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Incorrect. See “Doing – Thinking with Materials” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Materials are lifeless until given shape by a creator.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See “Doing – Thinking with Materials” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See “Doing – Thinking with Materials” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. If we examine artwork carefully we often discover pentimenti, or the traces of the artist’s revision.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See “Doing – Doing and Redoing” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See “Doing – Doing and Redoing” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. A critique in a studio can take several forms.   One of the most usual ones is:

 

  1. The class writes down only the negative things they can think of
  2. We all sit down and become unresponsive
  3. We suggest the professor grade them as they go along
  4. The entire class reviews the work together

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Correct. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. An excellent idea for a self-critique could take the form of a journal entry.

 

 

 

True

 

Correct. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. A constructive model for a critique would include which of the following:

 

  1. Description of what is there
  2. Analysis of the relationships
  3. Interpretation or meaning
  4. All of the choices

 

 

 

ANS:

 

a. Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

b. Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

c. Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

d. Correct. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

 

 

  1. Artists and designers do not have to submit to the critical review of other people, peers or clients.

 

 

 

True

 

Incorrect. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.

 

False

 

Correct. See “Critique – Constructive Criticism” in Chapter 1.